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  • IanButty
    Admin
    Post count: 69
    in reply to: Rhino Photos #447266

    Thanks, Andy, I’m a bit late saying it, but thanks.

    IanButty
    Admin
    Post count: 69
    in reply to: Michael’s Intro #447265

    Somehow I missed this into – brilliant! Nice to know you better – I think part of next week’s challenges I’m going to try to get others to post their intros here too. Thank you.

    (Lesson learned for me – keep a closer eye on the communities)

    IanButty
    Admin
    Post count: 69
    IanButty
    Admin
    Post count: 69
    in reply to: Test image upload #447180

    test 2

    IanButty
    Admin
    Post count: 69

    Hi Ron,
    Firstly, thank you for joining the Academy and for posting your question here in the forum. (Sorry the forum is a bit quiet, but we are working on that). I have split your post into its own thread so that it doesn’t get lost.

    Regarding the editing package – I think I’d need a little bit more information. Are looking to do bulk editing? By that, I mean copying processing info from one image to the next or are you looking just to be able to edit one image at a time? Secondly, are you shooting in RAW?

    Effectively there are two times of editing packages. The first manages your workflow and is good for bulk edits – similar to Lightroom. The other is for editing images (more or less) one at a time like Photoshop.

    For a Lightroom alternative, you might want to look at On1 PhotoRaw 2020; For a Photoshop alternative, I’m hearing good things about Affinity Photo. However, I have to add I’ve not used either of them.

    Bonfires are tricky. The biggest problem is the dynamic range (ie the range of brightnesses that the camera can see) – they are very bright compared to what is around them. You have to decide whether you want to the fire exposed correctly or scene around it. If you expose for the fire you can get interesting silhouettes in front of the fire. If you expose for the scene around the fire the flames are likely to be be blown out. Of course shooting RAW will help as that will give you a large dynamic range. Perhaps I ought to create an inspiration sheet just about bonfires at some point.

    I hope that helps a little
    Ian.

    IanButty
    Admin
    Post count: 69

    Sorry, it has taken me so long to respond to the images you requested a critique on.

    This image doesn’t quite work for me. Sorry. The HDR effect, I think has flattened the contrast/brightness rages a little too much. I am guessing you were trying to bring out the detail in the shadows along the towpath? I think it needs just a fraction more shadow? Also, the white along the edge of the water (bottom centre) is very distracting. I’m not sure if this is a real reflection or an artifact caused by the pseudo-HDR process.

    Compositionally the image isn’t bad.

    IanButty
    Admin
    Post count: 69

    Interesting image. Looks well exposed. Just a quick suggestion – with a scene like this think about just photographing the reflection without the full building, just keeing the very bottom of the building at the top of the image. There is enough detail in the reflection alone to keep the viewer’s interest. I sometimes do that and then invert the image afterwards.

    Here’s an example of where I have done it:
    http://photos.imb.biz/travel/norway/alesund1503/e4af18699

    IanButty
    Admin
    Post count: 69
    in reply to: Blue #443114

    I really like this image the point of view works well. By setting the WB to sunny while in a very shady location it will naturally give the image a blue colour-cast. Was this this what you intended? In other words, did you plan this or was it just a happy accident? Whatever the case, you’ve now learned that technique and hopefully, it will be one that you can call on again in the future when circumstances dictate.

    IanButty
    Admin
    Post count: 69

    To access The Academy Member Lounge - you need to be an Academy Member.

    IanButty
    Admin
    Post count: 69

    Having just seen the original image in the Facebook group I would not crop in quite so tight as you have here. Instead, I would include just a small section of the mist at the top of the image. Probably about the same height of mist as the distance between the red boat and the bottom of the frame. That should create a balance between top and bottom.

    IanButty
    Admin
    Post count: 69

    Hi Garry,
    I’m so sorry this one has taken so long to get to provide feedback – I had to join the Canon Facebook group first before I could see the image! That took a couple of days to get approved and then I just forgot to copy the image over to my website and provide feedback.

    I am so glad I got to it today though – this is probably the best image I have seen from you! Very, very, well done. I love the colour toning on this – it the slightly muted colours works really well. You’ve ticked the boxes in terms of composition – rule of thirds and repetition. The reflections of the building in the background work really well and the panorama crop is perfect for this image. As I was there that day, I know that there wasn’t much detail in the sky, so your decision to crop it out, was the right one.

    If I had a nit-pick with the image (and it really is a nit-pick) I would perhaps have like to have seen just a fraction more of the mountains – but I don’t know how much more you could include while still keeping the white sky out of shot. So that really is a nit-pick.

    Thank you for sharing the image! You can be justifiably proud of this shot.

    IanButty
    Admin
    Post count: 69

    Hi Garry,
    I thought I had replied to this one, but clearly I haven’t! This is certainly an improvement over the previous one. And the small jetties do help to lead the viewer’s eye into the image.

    I have two issues with the shot however – the first, I think you know what I am going say is the colour cast. The green colour in the shadow areas makes this look like it has had a odd post-production filter applied to it (if I had to guess I would say a lomography filter). I suspect that you quite like the odd colour effects in your images (and if you do that’s fine, they are your images). But my suggestion for you at the moment is to concentrate on making your colours as realistic as possible. Even if what you are aiming for is colour cast because once you have got a good base image you can control how the colour changes affect the image.

    The second area is the bright white section of the sky – the eye is drawn to it away from the rest of the scene. I’m going to be doing a technique sheet or blog post in a few weeks all about preserving detail in the sky so look out for that. The quickest solution however is to check the image on the back of the camera and if you can see the detail blown out, use exposure compensation to underexpose until it isn’t. Then in post-production you can bring up the shadow areas.

    Hope that helps – I’ll have a look at some of the other images later – I’ve mentioned in this weeks Newsletter that you have posted images here for review and I am asking Academy Members to add their thoughts so that you get a different perspective than just mine.

    IanButty
    Admin
    Post count: 69
    in reply to: Response time? #442818

    In preparation for the new Community (forum replacement), I have changed the website so that images are hosted on Amazon S3. Not sure if that will improve the performance or not. (Guess there is always a chance it could make it worse – but I really hope not!)

    The change happened around midnight on 12 Sept 2018 – please let me know if you have noticed any difference.

    IanButty
    Admin
    Post count: 69
    in reply to: Andy's Intro #442791

    Thanks for adding your intro here, Andy.

    Interesting that you say you favourite bit of kit is the black rapid. I’ve never fancied those sling type straps, too much unbuckling to put the camera down when going up ladders while working in the studio. Also, I think I’d just end up clouting my camera on everything when it’s at my side.

    IanButty
    Admin
    Post count: 69

    Hi Linda,
    Thanks for taking the time to introduce yourself. Getting sharp images is an interesting topic, I think that is worthy of doing an Inspiration Sheet (or possibly it should be called a technique sheet)

    Not wanting to pre-empt that but three things to think about for sharpness.
    1. Check what aperture you are using – your lenses will be at it’s sharpest f/8 – f/11.
    2. Many ‘unsharp’ images can be blamed on not using a fast enough shutter speed. Rule of thumb is minimum shutter speed of 1/s for hand holding.
    3. Focusing and shooting technique. Try not to sway when shooting, and breath out as your press the shutter release

    I look forward to seeing the results of you lead-in lines and beach images. Have a great time in Tenby.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 44 total)